Radio Results Blog

More Foreign Radio Commercials Worth Stealing (ahem) Borrowing

Posted by Larry Julius on Sun, Jun 30, 2013 @ 12:25 PM

Radio Advertising Portland Maine Effective CommercialsIt's Okay!  If you hear a radio commercial you like, then figure out what makes it effective and steal it...it's a tradition.  The creative arts are full of thieves. Painter Pablo Picasso said, "Good artists borrow, great artists steal."  Writer William S. Burroughs said, “All writing is in fact cut-ups. A collage of words read heard overheard.”   Poet T.S., Eliot says, “Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different."  But according to filmmaker Jean-Luc Goddard, stealing is just not enough. Goddard said, “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.

”Below is a collection of 5 foreign radio commercials worth stealing or, if you prefer, borrow from.

1. Panamericana School of Art & Design - Brazil

Our brains process sound faster than any other sensory input. According to Seth Horowitz, an auditory neuroscientist at Brown University, "Hearing is a quantitatively faster sense. While it might take you a full second to notice something out of the corner of your eye, turn your head toward it, recognize it and respond to it, the same reaction to a new or sudden sound happens at least 10 times as fast." What I like about the commercial below, is that it uses the same sound repeatedly as a sort of sonic Rorschach Test.  The result is an engaging spot where the advertiser's benefit is arrived at quite logically.

[Media Player Doesn't Appear? Click Here to Hear]

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2. Virgin Atlantic Airlines - South Africa

There is a spot in our brain's cerebral cortex called Broca's area. This area functions as sort of a traffic copy, turning away predictable sonic input and allowing through the unusual. On a primitive level, this is the area of our brain that would allow us to instantly discern the sounds of a predator approaching from the cacophony of our environment.  If an advertiser can violate the expectancy of this area of our brain in this manner, then we will be more likely to process the message.  This commercial does indeed violate our expectancy by creating a series of odd and unpredictable images.

[Media Player Doesn't Appear? Click Here to Hear]

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3. South Australia Tourism - Australia

In her book Wired For Story, Lisa Cron points out that every second "your senses are showering you with over 11,000,000 pieces of information.  Your conscious mind is capable of registering about forty of them.  And when it comes to paying attention?  On a good day you can process seven bits of data at a time." Cron goes on to explain the research of neuroscientists who have found that our brains have developed a way to consciously navigate the overwhelming amount of information we are bombarded with every second.  She distills the findings into one word: STORY. This commercial engages the listener with its once-upon-a-time storytelling.

[Media Player Doesn't Appear? Click Here to Hear]

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 4. Union Hearing Centre - Canada

Like a good horror movie, the "monster" in this commercial lurks at the fringes of listener's tranquility. Then, when it is least expected it, the monster pounces.  Awesome!

[Media Player Doesn't Appear? Click Here to Hear]

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5. HBF Insurance - Australia

The typical 60-second radio commercial can comprise 165 words.  Too many commercials will try and squeeze every last syllable in taxing the listener's ability to comprehend its message. Great radio commercials use "negative space" or silence as a dramatic tool to demonstrate a products benefit.  The silence in this commercial speaks volumes!

[Media Player Doesn't Appear? Click Here to Hear]

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Small Business Advertising Portland Maine

Tags: Effective Radio Advertising, Portland Maine Radio, Small Business Marketing